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Fresh spirulina manufacturing process

Fresh spirulina manufacturing

In this short article, we thought to share with you a little about the fresh spirulina manufacturing process, present and upcoming…

Fresh raw spirulina

Fresh spirulina harvested - fresh spirulina manufacturing

Spirulina just seconds after it was harvested from the water

Here you can see fresh spirulina right after harvesting, (i.e. taken out of the water/growth media), still vibrating under the sun.

Fresh spirulina paste

This picture shows spirulina paste. This is what fresh raw spirulina looks like when the excess water was extracted from it.

Fresh raw spirulina in a jar - fresh spirulina manufacturing

Fresh raw spirulina paste after pressing excess water

Freshly frozen spirulina

This picture featuring freshly frozen spirulina packaged in 20gr portion. Freezing is done immediately after the water extraction to ensure sealing of all the goodness fresh spirulina has to offer.

Freshly frozen spirulina - fresh spirulina manufacturing

Freshly frozen spirulina – 20gr

Spirulina crunch

This picture is of dried spirulina. These are spirulina flakes, crunch. They go really well in salads and yoghurts, for example, boosting your health by adding minerals, vitamins and plant source protein.
Dried spirulina is not as great as the freshly frozen, though, the dehydrating, heating process is destroying some of its vital health components.

Spirulina crunch flakes

Spirulina flakes, crunchy

Phycocyanin extract

This picture below is of extracted Phycocyanin off the spirulina. We isolated this pigment to illustrate the abundance presence of this healthy pigment in the spirulina. Phycocyanin is the blue pigment that gives the spirulina it’s blue-green colour. It is a potent and very powerful antioxidant. (e.g. 20 times more potent than vitamin C).
Below the phycocyanin photo, there is another image illustrating what antioxidants do.
You can read about phycocyanin in more details in this short article: Phycocyanin: valuable component of spirulina

Spirulina Pycocyanin extract

Spirulina Phycocyanin extract

Phycocyanin electron donating - antioxidant action

Phycocyanin electron donating – antioxidant action

The photo above: Illustration of the what antioxidant and free radical are and how they interact. Many people are raising an eyebrow, nod and move uncomfortably when antioxidants are mentioned. On the next newsletter, we will elaborate on those.

That’s about it,
a short tour of how fresh spirulina is manufactured, showing you the beginning and the end results. Other middle stages involve water testing, measuring values (e.g. pH, temp etc..), scanning for properties (e.g. the presence of minerals, vitamins, Omega – 3, 6 & 9 compounds, protein etc..), correct nutrient mixing, quality testing etc…

You are welcome to contact us with questions either through our facebook page or the contact us form.

4 Responses to Fresh spirulina manufacturing process

  1. Leif Dahms January 19, 2017 at 9:19 am #

    Awesome post! I read your site fairly often and you always post really great stuff.

    I shared this on Facebook and my followers really enjoyed it.
    Keep up the good work! 🙂

  2. Tinisha Houchin March 11, 2017 at 7:57 pm #

    Wonderful site. Lots of useful information here. I am sending it to some friends ans also sharing in delicious. And obviously, thanks for your effort!

  3. jason May 14, 2017 at 5:27 pm #

    What of this new drying process in the uk that avoids the hot air blast and results in a dry flake or ‘noodle’ that does not have the fishy flavor of typical dried powders? I am trying to find a US source of such spirulina.

    • Yair July 11, 2017 at 10:06 am #

      Hello Jason,
      I am not familiar with that new process you are talking about. We make flakes as well in a controlled environment and still, as time goes by the flakes too, have that familiar Spirulina smell. Only fresh Spirulina doesn’t smell.
      Think of it when it comes to fish. Fresh fish of the sea don’t smell, you hold them out for a little while and even though they are still good for consuming they develop that bad smell.

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